ANTI‑

Not first use ever, as the term originated on DataLounge, merely first use in the Times, which has lied about us for decades: “With the notable exception of Christopher Isherwood, there were few benevolent eldergays in the literary scene.” (I did a database search to be sure.)

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2018.09.03 11:28. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2018/09/03/timeseldergay/

  • Fontmemes (bookmarks).

    5,318,008 upside doewnlooks like BOOBIES on a calculator, but not on an iPhone

    Helvetica not legible

  • Also, I offer the worst bookmark export ever – derived from my Type à blogger folder on Instapaper. Beyond the 45 minutes I spent cleaning them up, which efforts are not really visible, I am never going to get to these. And even that piece-of-shit file is valid HTML.

    But. Honourable mention from James Montalbano: “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country. My country told me to fuck off.” (Later.)

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2018.08.29 14:03. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2018/08/29/fontmemes/


I’m going to adapt somebody else’s geopolitical analysis (see below) to our debased “LGBT+” reality.

  1. China has a naval base in Djibouti, bafflingly. (The U.S. and Japan also have bases there.) China has untold investments in Africa and halfway runs the place. Djibouti is a quick sortie by tank convoy to the hotspots of Somalia, Ethiopia, and Eritrea.

  2. Han Chinese are ethnocentric, have no “white guilt,” and are not kind to their internal minorities (numbering more than 50), particularly Tibetans and Uyghurs. By no means are all those minorities “Oriental.” China floods troublesome minority provinces with Han Chinese.

  3. China, like Japan, intentionally rewrites and lies about history.

  4. I’m going to apply the same logic I use when trying to persuade first‑ and second-generation vizmins and children of immigrants to retain their ancestral languages (at any cost). Everything’s working great for you now in English, but spool out 500 years into the future and ask yourself how many people on Earth will be speaking your original language. (How’d that work out for the Indians?) You don’t speak it and your kids won’t, either. Maybe their kids will feel a lack, but probably not, and it might be too late anyway. Your five centuries’ worth of unilingual descendants will do nought but contribute to the death of your language.

Now picture Djibouti even a century hence. China will have flooded the place with Chinese and will have de facto control over the country. In fact, they may do a reverse Hong Kong or Macau and buy Djibouti outright. But they probably won’t need to: There will be so many Chinese in the country (true for everyone’s living memory) that they’ll be able to say with a straight face that Djibouti has always been Chinese.

What about black people? Blacks aren’t Han. But China historically has hosted many minorities, not all of them even vaguely resembling Han Chinese. Plus China is so committed to colonies off the mainland that it bought a couple of them back in a previous century. Of course the Ethiopic Djibouti blacks were always part of China. And since China will control the Internet and will write all the textbooks and run all the schools, it will be impossible to locate contradictory evidence without leaving the country, which, actually, they might make it difficult or impossible to do, or just not worth it.


Now picture “LGBT+” a century hence. [continue with: “Djibouti has always been Chinese” →]

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2018.08.17 15:51. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2018/08/17/djibouti/

I previously wrote:

[Oliver] Sacks would interview his patients and typewrite 500 words about each of them, their conditions, their lives. (Almost my exact approach when I meet anyone from another nation, tribe, or language group. I just don’t jot anything down.) Now, if only I could put my hands on the article that showed Sacks appearing last onstage at a neurological conference, after everyone else had recited dry “case histories,” and asking the attending doctors “Why aren’t any of you telling us what your patients are like?”

Sacks, in his own On the Move:

  • I would sometimes tell [a medical student] to see a patient with, say, multiple sclerosis – to go to her room and spend a couple of hours with her. Then he had to give me the fullest possible report not only on her neurological problems and ways of living with them but on her personality, her interests, her family, her entire life history….

    [He] was often struck by the fact that I would often recommend original (often 19th-century) accounts. No one else in medical school, [he] said, ever suggested that he read such accounts; they were dismissed, if mentioned at all, as “old stuff,” obsolete, irrelevant[.]

  • Series are needed – all sorts of generalizations are made possible by dealing with populations – but one needs the concrete, the particular, the personal too, and it is impossible to convey the nature and impact of any neurological condition without entering and describing the lives of individual patients.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2018.08.16 15:28. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2018/08/16/casenotes/

  • Mr. QUENTIN CRISP’s “representative on Earth,” Mr. JOHN HURT, enacting a moment in which Mr. CRISP might be happy, in The Naked Civil Servant.

    Mr. Crisp, in red-hennaed hair and a scarf, beams brightly as five sailors surround him good-naturedly
  • Steven Tilotta’s study (or colourized) of how Liberace might respond if surrounded by all-but-identical masked and harnessed pups.

    Man with blond hightlights, wearing polka-dotted harness and faux-fur wrap over one shoulder, surrounded by four guys in harnesses and pup hoods

Mr. CRISP of course never really experienced a happy moment.

I did tell you I took him to luncheon, did I not?

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2018.08.16 15:11. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2018/08/16/happycrisp/

In much the same way that the WordPerfect supplementary spellchecker dictionary was a window onto the soul circa 1988, one’s iPhone lock screen fills much the same function three decades later.

It goes without saying everybody else’s lock screen is awful, and, worse, entirely unconsidered. The system battles good taste on several fronts, offering deceptively named Move and Scale options that only allow the former in practice. Go the extra mile and save images in native resolutions (hard to look up and complicated by behind-the-scenes scaling and now parallax or perspective) and you encounter the fact that the two most difficult things to get onto or off of an iPhone are a photo and an URL.

Three lock screens
  • I was trying for a minimalist design (later I noticed it made my phone entirely black) that anyone nearby would struggle to notice, let alone decode. I used Weekend fan art, inverting it successively in each of the modes Graphic­Converter offers, of which the final sepia is one. It took easily a dozen tries to get image width right, add padding, and vertically position it correctly. And it is indeed a tracing of the iconic image of Russell and Glen’s final kiss.

  • For iPhone Eks, I disclosed to artist Topher McCulloch that I had been reusing his work all along, and asked for a version that would natively fit the new resolution. He sent one back, but, to my surprise, the original wallpaper transferred over perfectly with no intervention.

    But that became too austere and ascetic. Plus I’d been looking at it for years, or had become banner-blind to it over time. Something with a bit more life was in order: This was a job for Edgar Murillo’s colour sense. Again very few illustrations could be crammed into the unyielding aspect ratio.

After I set up these beautiful and vibrant interfaces, two words that rarely go along with the third, I looked around at so-called gay lock screens and found nothing but banged-together “LGBT+” propaganda. We’re supposed to have taste.

Fundamentally, these are our personal phones, and we can put whatever we want on them, whether it be porn or inspiring male photography and illustration or (I’m thinking of my longtime friend’s lock screen here, which requires pages of scrolling through small-type notifications) cruising alerts from Grindère or Scruff.

Wangs and pup tails are up next.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2018.08.11 14:10. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2018/08/11/lockscreens/


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