“WE KNOW A FAB CROSS-DRESSING PRIEST.
HE’S STRAIGHT, BUT HE IS H.I.V., SO THAT’S SOMETHING

Books are terrible; publishing is an oligopoly with a progressive agenda; dumbass Millennial girls, with no history reading professionally-edited copy, now professionally edit and typeset copy. Books are terrible.

Out of the 150-odd books I bought, borrowed, downloaded, or simply blew through in 2019, a few were nonterrible even if their typography nonetheless was.

  1. Saving Beauty by Han Byung-Chul.

  2. Peak: The New Science of Athletic Performance [subtitle continues for some time – Ed.] densely and with good typography covers everything from mindset to constituent molecules. I’m still picking my way through it (again: dense).

  3. Bronze Age Mindset indeed is a poorly-assembled print-on-demand paperback. Yet this “book” is conceptually viable only as fungible electronic text. Akin to Don Norman’s just-noticeable difference, Bronze Age Mindset is just original enough to be captivating and memorable. (Q.v.)

  4. Sexual Landscapes by James D. Weinrich, while rather eccentrically typeset, offers a voice I’ve never encountered before in presenting academic arguments to laypeople. He’s delightful. Weinrich’s section “What happens when sissies and tomboys grow up?” is the only original contribution to that topic. (By a wide margin – positively not “just original enough.”)

  5. You’re on an Airplane: A Self-Mythologizing Memoir by Parker Posey must be experienced in the authoress’s voice.

  6. Dave Addey goes into well more than the level of detail you would reasonably wish for in Typeset in the Future: Typography and Design in Science-Fiction Movies. More really is more in this kind of design criticism, whose tone recalls that history of synthetic voices with the perfect title, How to Wreck a Nice Beach.

    (Indeed, should we not informally refer to Addey’s book as Typeset in the Futura [q.v.]?)

  7. Provocations by Camille Paglia assembles everything from AOL screenshots to AOL chat sessions.

    In John Waters’ aperçu, there are some people for whom Deborah Harry is Elvis. Paglia achieved originality so vast you have to be blind, or blinkered, not to read in awe.


Three books all but permanently reset my outlook in the broadest sense. (Wat means‽)

  1. The hugely disturbing Jaws: The Story of a Hidden Epidemic (Sandra Kahn) rewrote my beliefs about sleep apnea and childhood orthodontia. I was unaware I had any such beliefs.

    I was not wrong to notice an onslaught of chinless pencil-necked geeks in living memory, many of whom, this book proves via X‑rays and photographs, will suffer from blocked airways for a lifetime. What seems contradictory on its face is that correcting such underbites the wrong way in childhood also leads to blocked airways.

    If you fancy the opposite of the pencil-necked geek (fellas with necks as wide as their earlobes are separated), well, guess which other group can’t breathe through a night’s sleep, either.

  2. The Courage to Be Disliked by Ichiro Kishimi vitiated its purpose when the ostensible philosopher engaged in dialectic with the ostensible student was shown to be female. But, like Jaws, The Courage to Be Disliked effectively rewrites unexamined truths as it reveals a non-Fruedian theory of the human mind (the Adlerian philosophy). Freudianism is so steeped in our psyches that it is shocking to imagine not cause and effect as primary human motivator (this happened as a boy; I am unhappy now as a man) but purpose (one is unhappy because it serves a purpose). If any apple cart deserved to be upended, I see now it is Freud’s.

    (In a Smithee-like oddity, searching even LC catalogue records [and sources beyond] reveals no translator credit.)

  3. Beauty by Stefan Sagmeister (and ostensibly Walsh, but let’s be serious) tells readers that some things are valuable because they are beautiful. To its detriment, Beauty is the kind of designed object that will be read only by those who already accept that beautiful things are valuable.

    • I do not know how to explain to Windoids, NPCs, basic bitches, and other nonentities who have so little going for them that I can sum them up in catchphrases that beauty has value.

    • Where I would fault Sagmeister is his inability to recognize that his own demimonde, namely progressive New Yorkers and Europeans, are the only faction in our society that militates against beauty, quite often with billyclubs, “concrete”-laced “milkshakes,” and bike locks.

    • Sagmeister cites research, which I tracked down and read, that shows artistically educated subjects find asymmetry beautiful while normals do not. That finding conforms to my own experience with postmodern architecture (cf. Charles Jencks’ photo cutlines). (Photo of some of Sagmeister’s citations.)

    • Spiekermann (q.v.) is one of who knows how many designers claiming their job is to make the world marginally less ugly. No wonder we – “we” – have failed when we’ve aimed so low.

      Still, I do think there has to be a 21st-century way of teaching Windoids, NPCs, basic bitches, and other nonentities the first step (it’s a lulu) in understanding that one can communicate visually, not just in words.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.12.31 12:33. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/12/31/books2019/

Even more bons mots from the discussion forum (q.v.) that, like all parts of the Internet, decays and rusts into an outcropping that gives you tetanus when it carries out surprise anal.

  • “One Boy, One Special Boy”:

    I was reading an article about Luca Guadagnino in the New Yorker. The article quotes from a book about Klaus Mann: “There is only one face you love. It is always the same.” I started to think about that. As I search over the men I have been attracted to, loved, wanted, I noticed that they all had similar faces – whether known or celebrity.

    I have no idea who owned that first face that I loved. But I wonder is that just type or a covert desire for the first face? Is it the face or the person and we cannot divorce the face from the traits that we desire? I love Nick Lachey’s face. But he is just the face – not the original person.

    I concede I find Nick Lachey, which name is pronounced Lashé, adorable. I concede further that Armond White is correct about the director whose name is a random assemblage of Scrabble tiles: “By making Elio so precocious yet intense, with none of the usual adolescent banality, Guadagnino reveals he is more than a little in love with the memory of being jailbait.”

  • I did have therapy for a long time… and for some reason as a result I was able to talk to and be friends with men, straight men in particular, a lot more than before. There was one time I only really felt comfortable with women and gay men who were totally non-threatening. I don’t even know why this change took place – probably just a general gain in confidence. And the fact that I had a male therapist who I learned to trust, and like, must have helped a lot. I wasn’t seeking to change this particular trait in my therapy. But it happened, and I’m actually even more comfortable with men now than women.

    versus

    I can just imagine all you pretentious, snobby little effeminate boys when you were young, dissing your hard-working parents because their way of life wasn’t good enough for you because it didn’t align with what you saw on Dynasty.

  • Body image: “Upper-middle-class GOOP thinspo asceticism. No, thanks” versus:

    In hindsight, I think I had a big problem with food for a long time. I was naturally skinny with a fast metabolism, but I also got off on the idea of looking different and having my appearance surprise people. Thin was very much the thing in the ’90s, and I guess I liked my eyes being larger by default and clothing always fitting me easily.

    …and I won’t lie and say that I felt hungry and weak constantly. I actually seemed to run on a lot of energy, but in hindsight it was definitely nervous energy and adrenaline. I would stay up late studying, and ride out waves of hunger just to see if I could do it. And I could. And you can too.

    Don’t.

    It’s obvious you aren’t really listening to advice right now, but the truth is your body needs fuel and your muscles need exercise and that’s what will see you through a life of health and comfort. You have no idea the problems osteoporosis can cause, and people who are malnourished deal with that at a young age. Even though I’m eating healthy now, three times a day, my bones are starting to make cracking noises and stiffen and I just don’t feel anywhere near as limber as I used to. Also, your body naturally gets colder as you age. Fat and muscle protect you from that.

    I realize we live in a society where the æsthetic is to look like a cartoon character with a big head and an impossibly tiny waist and delicate hands, or to look like some super-jacked superhero athlete…. But wanting to look a certain way in a photograph is not your job. Your job is to take care of the one thing that you own, which is your body. So stop playing these games and telling yourself it works great and there will be no consequences. There will be. You can bet on that.

    Plus, if what you’re worried about is appearances, having no fat in your face will make you age incredibly fast. I look at guys my age now who I suspect were athletic in their late teens and early twenties, and ate regular full meals, or even the guys who were only moderately active and ate full meals, and their faces still look full. I have a slight hollow look to my face, probably from years of seeing how little I can eat and still be functional. I’m not hideous by any means, but I think I understand now why actresses and even some actors end up getting fillers put in. Having a round face looks a lot nicer than being Skeletor. Plus everyone who hugged me when I was growing up said it made them uncomfortable because I was so bony.

    Having a little muscle or a little fat is actually really appreciated by those who have to look at you and touch you. That’s why someone like Gwyneth Paltrow, for example, isn’t thought of as being sexy in the least. She’s bony. Sure, that means she fits into designer clothes and gets on a magazine cover, but she is far from being a sex symbol.

    I guess there’s no convincing you, but please take these words to heart and reconsider what you’re doing. Nobody who loves you in any real way will tell you to skip meals and starve yourself for the sake of a look. When there are times of war, and people don’t have access to food, they aren’t walking around feeling great about their collarbone is finally protruding, or having no fat on their [abdomens]. You need to eat. It’s healthy. And there’s a lot of delicious food out there that’s healthy for you and won’t make you obese! Go try some new dishes. Eating is really a joy. It doesn’t mean you’re a pig.

    Please speak to someone about changing this interior monologue that you have going about how much better it is to be thin. You’ve been duped by a society that doesn’t really make much sense. And at some point you’re going to start to see the consequences of what you’ve done by denying yourself food several days a week. Treat your body with TLC.

    …which by itself has to be the greatest contribution DataLounge has ever seen, with a perfectly modulated tone.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.12.24 20:56. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/12/24/dataloungemanorexia/

Some discussion fora are even more disreputable than DataLounge and RealJock. Some fora’s names even dare to eschew interCaps.

  • T777:

    The more common hot successful women would be lawyers, or those who got in on the ground floor of a startup that succeeded (which only a very small percent do).

    LOL. The real world isn’t like television, Harjit.

    Lawyerettes are glorified paralegals who will leave the practice as soon as they get a shiny rock on their insectile little finger or they’re soon-to-be-embittered, hard-drinking career womyn with visible cellulite sag underneath their Ann Taylor loft pantsuit.

  • Not T777:

    The modern normie desires to live in a sitcom as this is the highest ideal to be pursued under ZOG. 21st-century man may be over-medicated, physically weak, lonely and disposable, but gee whiz his life sure is wacky. Thus, modern customer service and even workplace relationships are predicated on curating the optimal sitcom experience.

    Imagine spending your morning under your goofy, fun-loving boss who lets all his employees know that he plays Thundercats video games on his i‑phone. His quirks (he’s probably a furry) ultimately remind you that HE IS HUMAN, just like you, and you should just excuse his ambitions and sociopathy as part of his immaturity, his major character flaw, which is also what makes him so authentic.

    Lunchtime arrives. You go grab a quiche and a macchiato at the local coffee shop. You exchange some banter with the cutie waitress (her name is Liz and she thinks you’re gross) while her boss acts all cantankerous in the background (he used to loudly announce that he was the quiche Nazi every day to let customers know he was very serious about his quiches while also not being very serious, until Donald Trump made Nazi jokes problematic). You come back to the workplace only to see your wacky boss dancing in an ironically bad fashion to Macklemore’s “Dance Off.” A coworker performs the appropriate sigh while another rolls her eyes, to signal to your boss that the desired effect was achieved. You work for the next few hours while an American-born Asian coworker bumps rap music in the background, preferably Ice Cube’s “It Was a Good Day” or 50 Cent’s “P.I.M.P.” (nigger music in the workplace, that’s crazy).

    Then, after you drive home listening only to THE FINEST MACKLEMORE (“Thrift Shop,” “Penis Song,” “Bush Song,” a replay of “Dance Off,” all classics), you order some Chinese food which you will drink with kombucha, recommended to you by your wacky friend, who amongst his many eccentricities is a kombucha enthusiast (the name sounds funny), while you catch up on your favorite sitcom, Aziz Ansari’s Master of None, and laugh at how the flustered Dravidian getting sassed by a quirky waitress reminds you of Liz back at the coffee shop, and how she’ll totally date you once make enough self-deprecating jokes about how your life is going nowhere (at the same time, you of course appreciate how you eating fast food alone in your apartment while watching a sitcom is just like how the sitcom protagonist eats fast food alone in his apartment while watching a sitcom).

    Yes, once Liz sees how authentic you are, she’ll be sure to go out with you just so she can hear more wacky stories about how your ex-girlfriend cheated on you with her MMA instructor while you were off at your father’s funeral. You smile to yourself softly while Aziz Ansari makes a joke about how pathetic his orgasm sounds in the background.

    Today was a good day.

    Cf.Human Capital.”

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.12.24 09:37. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/12/24/geewhiz/

(UPDATED) The founder and host of the YouTube livestreams known as the Gaytriarchy, Sam Kehl, died in the most insipid and ignominious way possible in mid-December 2019 – by slipping in the bathtub and incurring a head injury.

Man with skin illustrations in hat and open shirt sings into microphone

Prince of Queens archives

Obituary

Samuel Justin Kehl (1982–2019)

Man with beard and glasses in red windbreaker Sam Kehl, 37, died unexpectedly on Thursday, December 12, 2019. Born on February 2, 1982, he was predeceased by his father, Ted Kehl, and is survived by his mother, Marty McLaren, sister Catherine Kehl, sister Lauren Kehl, nephew Tracy Kehl Doran, half-sisters Aisling Darling and Mary Kehl, and surrogate sister Kye Bailey.

Sam was a talented songwriter, music producer, and dramatist, and produced a YouTube channel for the last four years as Prince of Queens. Although Sam sometimes provoked outrage in those who disagreed, he was also admired for his courage, originality, and wit. He cared intensely about his relationships and he was dearly loved and cherished by a wide circle of friends, family, and fans.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.12.22 18:59. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/12/22/princeofqueensdied/

I maintain the list (q.v.), since Artforum cannot manage to render or typeset such a thing. (Though I did just realize I had misrendered one director’s name all along.)

  1. Climax

  2. Joan of Arc

  3. Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

  4. Border

  5. Amazing Grace

  6. Hail Satan?

  7. Pain and Glory

  8. The Golden Glove

  9. The Souvenir

  10. Joker

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.12.06 10:57. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/12/06/johnwaters2019/

When nongay authoress Naomi Wolf gets a fact about homosexuality substantively wrong, her book gets cancelled in the U.S.

When gay author Douglas Murray horrendously fucks up the facts about gay money in his book The Madness of Crowds, and when he and his publisher and agent ignore a stream of messages warning them of the error, the effect will be as follows – the book will go into second printings and a softcover edition, and Murray will continue to reiterate falsehoods on podcast interviews, which I’ve already heard him do twice.

What’s he wrong about? Let’s check his p. 242.

What if people aren’t oppressed?

Perhaps instead of seeking out oppression and seeing oppression everywhere, we could start to exit the maze by noting the various “victim groups” that aren’t oppressed or are even advantaged. For instance, studies have shown that gay men and lesbian women consistently earn more on average than their heterosexual counterparts. There are a variety of possible reasons, not least the fact that most of them won’t have children and can put in the extra hours at the office[,] which benefits both them and their employer. Is this a gay advantage?

Every part of that is simply wrong, except the lesbian angle, which isn’t really what he’s talking about. Even the single research paper he cites (evidently without reading it) disproved his own claim.

But no, of course Douglas Murray is not gonna get wolfed over an error of this magnitude. I’ve learned over the years that absolutely everybody is willing to lie about how much money gay males make (less than straight guys across the board). Murray is merely the latest such liar.

He’s got a bright future ahead of him.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.11.25 12:59. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/11/25/murray/

C. Paglia (“The Cruel Mirror: Body Type and Body Image as Reflected in Art”):

My final slide was of the current St. Pauli Girl Beer carton (“Germany’s fun-loving beer”). It shows a merry beer-hall maid, her bosom overflowing her peasant bodice and each hand effortlessly hefting three foaming beer steins – quite a feat! Her arms are flung wide in the embracing posture of medieval Madonnas. The St. Pauli Girl is in the Rubens line of powerful, exuberant, life-affirming women.

Swiss-gay-bodybuilder variant:

Muscular male in dirndl (or whatever the hell it is) does double biceps at Oktoberfest

(Not that Swiss gay bodybuilder [look him up on the Recons].)

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.09.29 12:26. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/09/29/paglia-bosoms/

Shirtless ginger in shorts stares right at us through his shades with well-wishers behind fences on both sides

(Patrick Vellner by Logan Five)

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2019.09.28 14:42. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2019/09/28/sportsphoto2019/

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