I HAVE BEEN TOLD I DESERVE
“A FULL LIFE THAT ISN’T JUST ABOUT FIGHTING FOR THINGS”

(UPDATED) “Why Your Teenager Can’t Use a Hammer”: The biomechanical skills you learn in shop class are like those you learn playing sports. You learn to move differently because you begin to think with your body.

Surely you’ve noticed that gays with fabulous gym bodies are still identifiable as gays from behind at a distance of two blocks. They move like the frightened, estranged, hidebound, intellectual children they once were. Whereas athletes move like athletes.

This also explains why gays apologize for taking up space while straight guys don’t even think once, let alone twice, about taking up all the space they need.

I think about this from time to time and my mental image involves the nerves running through the deltoids. It’s as if those nerves think for themselves and determine the kinds of motions a man can make. There is also a connection with the visual importance of the shoulder girdle, in that even an unhandsome man is instantly noticeable if chest, shoulders (front, rear, top), back, lats, biceps, and triceps are all well developed. You can spot all those inside a three-piece suit. And the whole effect is ruined if you move like somebody who’s been ashamed of himself his whole life.

Let the nerves in your shoulders move you.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2011.09.28 16:08. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
https://blog.fawny.org/2011/09/28/hammer/

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