You can choose compassion

Dr. I. Alex Abramovich is a researcher specializing in homelessness faced by gay, lesbian, and transgender youth. Abramovich is an FTM transgendered person, hence is female. She is the figurehead behind a proposal to the City of Toronto with two primary aims – increase the number of existing shelter beds in Toronto for gay, lesbian, and transgender youth and build a separate shelter for such persons. [continue with “Nobody likes a sore winner, Alex Abramovich” →]

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.30 12:28. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/30/ilona6temerity/

Updated from time to time.

2014.12.09

  1. Love & Radio, which is quite good:

    1. Violent”: Joyce Carol Oates–compliant “MMA” fighter with actual self-awareness Nick Salvatore:

      I was with my friend Alex, and one thing led to another, and we took to grappling. I realized it was one of the most intense experiences I’d had. Um, kind of like being in a crash, but, uh, not as necessarily life-threatening. And, I dunno, it drove me nuts. I started doing it as often as possible. I mean, it’s not necessarily what human beings are built to do, but it’s something that human beings seem very adept at, and I guess it just struck some sort of atavistic core with me – and drove me nuts.

      It’s – it’s almost like dancing, and it’s almost like fucking…. And sort of trying to find a way to arrange your body the way one might arrange words or paint or beats or whatever to achieve this sort of optimal æsthetic effect, which just happens to be, you know, the other person lying unconscious on the floor or whatever. It’s creative, but you get created, you get re-created….

      But, you know, I, and we – me and my friend Alex, we fought naked, uh, and, I mean, that was really weird…. Really weird. [“Did you like it?”] I did. I don’t know if we would do it again necessarily. Also, the tile floors really ripped up our knees and ankles.

    2. Daryl K. Davis, an African-American who befriends Klansmen

    3. Mathias Rust lands his plan in Red Square

  2. Grant mentions me on a Way with Words episode and gets Canadian spelling kind of wrong.

  3. The Nerdist talks to Clive Barker for almost two hours about every aspect of health and sexuality while never bothering to talk about his having AIDS or allegedly shooting up his husband with needles (case dismissed).

    (Previously: Why do we write?)

2014.10.05

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.12.09 13:01. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/12/09/podcastroundup/

Since my first meeting with the TTC in nearly seven years back in August, every month somebody has found cause to call me a faggot on the transit system. (They never expect a comeback like “Yeah, I am a faggot, but at least I graduated from high school.”)

It would be excessive to say that has never happened to me before, but never so often, and I have no memory of the last such incident before this summer.

What surprises me is I am much more bothered and offended by the way the TTC treated and treats me.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.12.09 10:23. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/12/09/correlation/

What happened in Queer Nation in Toronto circa 1991? (Not 1985, as stated here.) We could ask Scott Thompson – or I could, if ever would invite me onto his podcast, whose ostensible final episode included this monologue of his (interjections elided, ≈40:00):

I always hated activism. Eeevery time I tried to get involved in an activist group, I was – sometimes literally – thrown out…. Thrown out of Queer Nation. Yeah. For being a man. Because they were discussing something— It was so bizarre. At that time, people were so polarized. And also sexual politics were feverish. So they’d have these meetings where they were afraid to have leadership because leadership was seen as patriarchal. Because men were more physical, they were in your face, and they had louder voices and all, women were like, “That’s an unfair advantage!” So they refused to have leaders. So there’d be a male and a female as co-leaders. So it was chaos. […]

There was a discussion about – oh, this is so stupid! There was a gay hotline, and the female leader went up and she was going on about the sexism of the hotline. How can a hotline be sexist? Because they were getting like eight times more calls were coming from gay men getting attacked than women, and therefore that proves sexism. So I put my hand up, and, even though I wasn’t supposed to [because] a woman had to speak before me and then someone in a wheelchair, when I finally had my chance to speak, I said: “Well, maybe that’s because women aren’t gaybashed the way men are.” The next thing you know it was like: Sexist! Sexist!

And I said: “Everybody in this room knows that gay men are the target.” Men don’t go out to beat up lesbians. It might happen, but it’s a one-off. You know? It’s rare. And that’s more under the umrella of misogyny. But the truth is gaybashing is primarily about gay men. And I was thrown out. But thrown out for stating the obvious….

Oh, this would be 1985? Thrown out. I remember me and my boyfriend walked out at the time. I went, “I can’t stay in this stupid—” It was nonsense. I felt like I was in Soviet Russia back in the day…. It was like thoughtcrime. But look where we are today: There’s a lot of that going on. It never ended…. That’s my point. Whenever anyone is serious, all I hear is: Sexism! Hate crime! White male!

I remember being called “white male.” Like: “White male!” OK, whatever…. And most of the room was white males.

I actually have an anecdote of my own about Scott’s sitting a few rows behind me during and after my presentation on zapping Public Enemy.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.12.04 12:30. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/12/04/whitemale/

The amusingly volatile Armond White, as if serving tempeh two ways, reviews Foxcatcher with one angle for Out and rather a different one for National Review.

(Pro tip: chickenhawk is one word in either of its senses. Also, Brendan Lemon paid me a kill fee for a “Talk of the Town” piece I wrote for the New Yorker about John du Pont back dans la journée.)

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.28 15:54. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/28/foxcaughttwice/

Recommended (inevitably) by Armond White was Patrice Chéreau’s Son frère, which, like Free Fall, approaches homosexualism from unexpected angles (in the latter case including who does so from the rear). (A later review by White. Chéreau’s obituary; all we can hope for is to be half as interesting as he was.) For some months I have been the eldergay on the subway picking through the atrociously typeset library copy of the original book by Philippe Besson.

One brother in Son frère is sick, only it isn’t with AIDS and he’s the straight one. The gay brother is removed from his own feelings and is played unconvincingly by a visible heterosexualist. (Both lead actors have Italian surnames.) The gay brother suddenly has to give a shit and do so with a commitment, gravity, energy, and stamina never before needed. His skinny twink bf unit deals with everything better – so much so that he and the sick brother become pals behind his boyfriend’s back.

The gay brother does not need to feel bashful or ashamed about hanging out at the gay beach or actually being gay.

Straight brother: I really love you. I wanted you to know it. I’ve always loved you.

Yet he does. Really, it’s hard for us not to self-censor. But he’s willing to speak with honesty after he makes out for a moment with his brother’s girlfriend. (With full commitment from the actor. You can see the blood pumping.) The only time the brother/actor can be honest is after kissing a girl.

Gay brother: His was the first cock I touched. I think I jerked him off. He was the first boy I knew.

Son frère restates the lesson of The Long Day Closes and Toast and it remains the hardest lesson to learn: Men will let you love them.

Son frère: It’s icy, it’s distant, it has a great ending. Yes, the sick brother dies, as he must. But then the gay brother finally changes. It took his brother’s dying for that to happen. That, like loving him, was all right too.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.25 14:32. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/25/hisbrother/

Months in the making, Jesse Brown interviewed me on CanadaLand’s Episode 58.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.17 15:26. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/17/canadaland-interview/

A week ago, Spiekermann stood me up when he was in town for the only time – presenting at the same design conference that in its earliest years invited then disinvited me.

I feel my lifetime interest in typography has come to naught. That feeling pervades all my interests, in fact.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.16 12:18. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/16/spiekermann/

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