You can choose compassion

Recommended (inevitably) by Armond White was Patrice Chéreau’s Son frère, which, like Free Fall, approaches homosexualism from unexpected angles (in the latter case including who does so from the rear). For some months I have been the eldergay on the subway picking through the atrociously typeset library copy of the original book by Philippe Besson.

One brother in Son frère is sick, only it isn’t with AIDS and he’s the straight one. The gay brother is removed from his own feelings and is played unconvincingly by a visible heterosexualist. (Both lead actors have Italian surnames.) The gay brother suddenly has to give a shit and do so with a commitment, gravity, energy, and stamina never before needed. His skinny twink bf unit deals with everything better – so much so that he and the sick brother become pals behind his boyfriend’s back.

The gay brother does not need to feel bashful or ashamed about hanging out at the gay beach or actually being gay.

Straight brother: I really love you. I wanted you to know it. I’ve always loved you.

Yet he does. Really, it’s hard for us not to self-censor. But he’s willing to speak with honesty after he makes out for a moment with his brother’s girlfriend. (With full commitment from the actor. You can see the blood pumping.) The only time the brother/actor can be honest is after kissing a girl.

Gay brother: His was the first cock I touched. I think I jerked him off. He was the first boy I knew.

Son frère restates the lesson of The Long Day Closes and Toast and it remains the hardest lesson to learn: Men will let you love them.

Son frère: It’s icy, it’s distant, it has a great ending. Yes, the sick brother dies, as he must. But then the gay brother finally changes. It took his brother’s dying for that to happen. That, like loving him, was all right too.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.25 14:32. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/25/hisbrother/

Months in the making, Jesse Brown interviewed me on CanadaLand’s Episode 58.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.17 15:26. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/17/canadaland-interview/

A week ago, Spiekermann stood me up when he was in town for the only time – presenting at the same design conference that in its earliest years invited then disinvited me.

I feel my lifetime interest in typography has come to naught. That feeling pervades all my interests, in fact.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.16 12:18. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/16/spiekermann/

(CORRECTED) Technically clueless journalism reaches another new low with “Twitter essayist” Jeer Heet, whose non-Twitter article:

  • isn’t marked up as an ordered list

  • keeps talking about enumerated entries when in fact entries on Twitter are numbered only if you treat Twitter like a Selectric and type actual digits. Twits read backwards, which makes top-posting sound almost responsible by comparison. (“One problem: keeping track of numbers. Sometimes I miss one” is another way of saying “Twitter does not support markup, which this article proves I don’t understand and could not use anyway”)

  • fails to acknowledge that, while “Twitter essays” exist in some liminal sense, they don’t exist as an actual hyperlinkable entity, which is as good as not actually existing on the Web

  • again acts as though having somebody else “Storify” (v.) your Twits is a valid method of Web publishing

Downtown Toronto journalists: Utterly technically inept and eager to reinforce their ineptitude to each other. They think journalism is Gmail and Twitter (and Storify manqués). Every downtown Toronto journalist is a low-water mark for every other such journalist, whose abilities, like their expectations of themselves, can never be underestimated.

Let’s also take a look at the borked Unicode on Heer’s site:

Jeet Heer Web site with misencoded characters

When alerted by E-mail to almost all the foregoing last week, including the borked Unicode, I didn’t get a response. But, apparently quite separately, Heer went on to write for the Globe a defence of everything he does wrong, using incorrect HTML to do it. (I left the wrong impression about cause and effect in the first published version of this paragraph, and that prompted Jeet Heer to write in. You’re reading the corrected version.)

Also separately and regarding a different article, my favourite Globe developer explained that the lack of ordered lists comes about due to lack of human intervention. That indeed would be the problem.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.08 12:50. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/08/heertwits/

Back in March I got an E-mail from Stephanie Sawah. This U of T student was starting up a project that I knew had a defined outcome irrespective of the facts: Proving that the Yorkville branch of the Toronto Public Library was failing to serve the most downtrodden group since Jews in Buchenwald, namely transgenders.

After a lot of prodding, Sawah sent along her findings in an absurd double-spaced, single-column PDF, which I turned into what it should have been all along – real HTML – for her.

The paper hasn’t been published yet, but, since I assume it will be used as a bludgeon to shame TPL, I thought I would get out ahead of things and document Sawah’s inaccuracies. I would certainly suggest that she and her transgendered friends (again: the most downtrodden group of the 21st century) think twice about weaponizing this “research” against the library. [continue with “Transgender books at Yorkville branch: Correcting Stephanie Sawah before she does any more harm” →]

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.11.01 12:41. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/11/01/yo-transgenders/

Unlike dyspeptic, soi-disant “support[er] of LGBTQ rights” Glenn Fleishman (q.v.), heterosexualist male technology writer/editor Jason Snell has grown and learned from his mistakes. When asked if he still stood by his claim from 2011 that everything I write is “infuriating and wrong,” Snell replied:

Was I wrong in feeling that Cook’s position as a gay man was “private” until he chose to make it public? Maybe so.

I see your point – which I probably didn’t see clearly in 2011 – that privatizing sexual orientation can be seen as feeding right back into the closet.

Did we all “aid and abet the closet without even knowing it,” as you wrote back then? God, I sure hope not, but maybe we did. If we did, I’d argue that it came from a position of empathy for Tim Cook. I leave you to judge if that makes that reaction forgivable.

In my anger over what I perceived as an attack on my writer and a Gawker invasion of Tim Cook’s privacy, I decided to attack you in public. I apologize for that. Your perspective deserved more credit than I was willing to give it.

Full props to Snell.

Next: Arment and the Macalope, and, as usual on a kingly perch all his own, Gruber.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.10.31 16:48. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/10/31/snellcloset/

After Valleywag made the case, I wrote in 2011 that of course Tim Cook is gay. Of course he is. The computer press indeed is so liberal it put Tim Cook back in the closet.

All the big names were and are guilty of this sin. Let’s start with Glenn Fleishman. At the time (2011.02.03), I chose not to publish the following posting.

Confidential to Glenn Fleishman

The respected Macintosh and technology journalist, who, like me, wrote for Tidbits, objects to receiving private E-mail asking him to articulate his points directly to me. He objects in public, in fact.

Here, for the public record, is our conversation:

I would assume that a journalist would all but automatically formulate any objections to my post and send them along via electronic mail rather than emitting drive-by Twits. Like most, I would prefer to be talked to rather than about. And I can handily defend my position.

I see: You’re the boss of Tim Cook and the boss of me.

Here’s how this works: I have a private life (non-journalist) and a public life (journalist). I get to choose what I write about, and when I make comments on my Twitter feed, blog, or other personal resources I maintain myself, another party doesn’t get to pull out the “journalist” card and make demands on precisely how I comport myself.

Short version: Fuck off.

Future E-mails will be ignored or blocked.

In the intervening time, Fleishman decided that he is qualified to police women’s discussion of transgenderism. Just yesterday, he described himself as a “lifelong support[er] of LGBTQ rights.” We’ll be the judge of that.

Everyone’s reporting, including mine, about Tim Cook’s being gay was correct all along. It’s reporting, not outing, because a CEO’s being gay is not “private.” Fleishman was merely the nastiest of a coterie of heterosexualist writers defending the closet.

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.10.31 14:24. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/10/31/glennfcloset/

Khoi Vinh: “Helvetica has been the standard system typeface for iOS since the beginning, and largely without complaint.” Oh?

  • Why Apple’s new font won’t work on your desktop

  • Designers explain why Apple’s new OS X typeface is a strange choice

  • Spiekermann:

    • “Apple font ‘beautiful as typeface, totally sucks as an interface’ ”

    • German; translation:

      I have been asked what I think about iOS 7. Until now I just saw it secondhand, via screenshots on my iPad or mobile. But there is already a small shitstorm on the net that Apple now uses a ultra-light font like Helvetica Ultra Light that was originally designed for big font sizes and therefore is way too narrow.

      If you see a continuous text in 13 px, it is a nice, smooth, plain but unreadable carpet. I think this is a phenomenon when young graphic artists or industrial designers deal with typography because they focus on good-looking grey levels/tones. This is because they don’t read – they only look and see surfaces.

      I told you that already, actually.

      So the way they think about how to make something with leather or out of metal, they also think about type. And you can see it’s really hard to read. It looks beautiful, and especially on the retina display will look great, but it’s useless.

      I hope they will change it. I’ve met Jony Ive a couple of times, and, when we spoke, told him to get rid of vertical lines. I saw that some of them did actually disappear, like in the calendar; perhaps that was my influence. I’ll keep on looking at this. It’s like a youthful folly that young graphic designers often [fall prey to], to use Helvetica Ultra Light.

Need I also mention the flowchart of system settings made available to overcome the illegibility of Helvetica, which, like all grotesk typefaces, is completely unsuited to screen use?

The foregoing posting appeared on Joe Clark’s personal Weblog on 2014.10.28 13:13. This presentation was designed for printing and omits components that make sense only onscreen. (If you are seeing this on a screen, then the page stylesheet was not loaded or not loaded properly.) The permanent link is:
http://blog.fawny.org/2014/10/28/helvetikvetch/

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